The Ampersand

The Spiegel & Grau Tumblr
The artist, Molly Crabapple in conversation with Matt Taibbi and David Burr Gerrard from THE AWL, discussing the cover art:
Crabapple: This looks fucking sweet. … The gravitas and the meat grinder. One of the things that Matt keeps coming back to in the book is that, for all we might want to think that the justice system is grand and objective, for a lot of people it’s just this rigged meat grinder that has no relation to justice at all, while for other people, who are wealthy, they can pretty much do anything and they’re fine. So I wanted to capture this evil tick-tock lady of justice who’s grinding people into pulp.
Burr Gerrard: Though she’s still blind.
Crabapple: She’s a machine. She doesn’t need to see.
…
Crabapple: I couldn’t sell to this one guy. I couldn’t imagine something that I put so much energy into living in that guy’s house and hanging out with him every day. It felt creepy. He wanted to buy this piece [the original of The Divide cover].
Taibbi: Wow.
Did he know the story behind the piece?
Crabapple: No, he thought it was patriotic. He said: “I love Americana.”
All three of us laugh for quite a while.
I guess it is Americana, of a kind.

Taibbi: Reverse Americana. 

The artist, Molly Crabapple in conversation with Matt Taibbi and David Burr Gerrard from THE AWL, discussing the cover art:

Crabapple: This looks fucking sweet. … The gravitas and the meat grinder. One of the things that Matt keeps coming back to in the book is that, for all we might want to think that the justice system is grand and objective, for a lot of people it’s just this rigged meat grinder that has no relation to justice at all, while for other people, who are wealthy, they can pretty much do anything and they’re fine. So I wanted to capture this evil tick-tock lady of justice who’s grinding people into pulp.

Burr Gerrard: Though she’s still blind.

Crabapple: She’s a machine. She doesn’t need to see.

Crabapple: I couldn’t sell to this one guy. I couldn’t imagine something that I put so much energy into living in that guy’s house and hanging out with him every day. It felt creepy. He wanted to buy this piece [the original of The Divide cover].

Taibbi: Wow.

Did he know the story behind the piece?

Crabapple: No, he thought it was patriotic. He said: “I love Americana.”

All three of us laugh for quite a while.

I guess it is Americana, of a kind.

Taibbi: Reverse Americana. 

"One of the things I like to do with my art is humanize people who might have been swept away otherwise. Art is very different from photography because it’s slow. You can take a million photos with your phone, but art you have to care for. You have to put your everything into it. When I draw somebody like Monica, or Linda in here, I’m saying this person is valuable, and that this is worth looking at.
I have another picture in this book of women lining up to see their loved ones at Rikers Island. I took the bus out. They wouldn’t even let me into the visitors’ center with a pencil. I felt like this was an image no one sees, all these women dressed up really nicely to go see the guys whom they love who are locked up. They go through this incredibly sinister thing, waiting on line next to barbed wire, and then they’re searched, but they still have such dignity and gravitas, just trying to make a nice day for someone they care about.

I would try to look at scenes like that I thought were forgotten and try to bring them back from the memory hole.”—Molly Crabapple

"One of the things I like to do with my art is humanize people who might have been swept away otherwise. Art is very different from photography because it’s slow. You can take a million photos with your phone, but art you have to care for. You have to put your everything into it. When I draw somebody like Monica, or Linda in here, I’m saying this person is valuable, and that this is worth looking at.

I have another picture in this book of women lining up to see their loved ones at Rikers Island. I took the bus out. They wouldn’t even let me into the visitors’ center with a pencil. I felt like this was an image no one sees, all these women dressed up really nicely to go see the guys whom they love who are locked up. They go through this incredibly sinister thing, waiting on line next to barbed wire, and then they’re searched, but they still have such dignity and gravitas, just trying to make a nice day for someone they care about.

I would try to look at scenes like that I thought were forgotten and try to bring them back from the memory hole.”—Molly Crabapple

Molly Crabapple, who in the years since Taibbi called her ‘Occupy’s greatest artist’ has also established herself as a stellar writer. For The Divide, she has contributed illustrations of great terror and beauty.”—Burr Gerrard, The Awl

We were lucky to be at such a beautiful, inspiring celebration last night with Bryan Stevenson and his team at the Equal Justice Initiative’s 25th Anniversary dinner. Congratulations EJI!

The N.C.A.A. has a wonderful business model, one that any entrepreneur would love to have: a profitable business in which your employees help generate billions of dollars and basically work for the honor and the glory of the business and little more.

Expect the N.C.A.A. to fight this with all its resources. If the decision stands and other players at other universities try to unionize, the N.C.A.A.’s house of cards could collapse. It does not have a winning argument when it insists that it is not a commercial enterprise. Indeed, the organization argues against itself with each day of March Madness.

Face it: The jig is up.

Bill Rhoden in The New York Times on the decision to allow a Northwestern football players union, and the potential ramifications that decision could have on March Madness commercials forever and ever.

Staring down the barrel of another weekend without Rust Cohle? Luckily, time is a flat circle and we just published an eerie novel for you.

I spent the rest of the evening on the phone, letting Bess distract me with questions. She was irritated that I didn’t sound more excited about working with Daniel, but any thoughts of him had been pushed to the back of my mind. I wanted to tell her about the necklace, but I couldn’t bring myself to do it. She’d never fully understood my friendship with Cheri and barely tolerated my continued interest in her. I tried to go to bed, but no amount of singing frogs could lull me to sleep with the necklace hiding under my mattress, so I started a new list on the reverse side of “What Happened to Cheri.”

1. Coincidence. Someone else had the exact same necklace. With the exact same chip.
2. Cheri lost the necklace or gave it to someone else. No connection to the trailer.
3. She stayed in the trailer sometime during the year she was missing. For how long? Alone? If not, who was she with?

I didn’t scratch out number one, but I didn’t believe it. Number two wasn’t likely, either, because Cheri had loved that necklace and wasn’t careless with her things. I had no way of knowing what had really happened. She’d been in the trailer or she hadn’t. Either way, she was gone, and no list would bring her back.

—from Laura McHugh’s The Weight of Blood (Spiegel & Grau, 2014)

Genius Excerpt from Galadrielle Allman

Rock Genius—the internet pioneer of enhanced text—has some amazing, detailed excerpts up for Galadrielle Allman’s book PLEASE BE WITH ME and we have a sample to whet your appetite. We aren’t official sponsors—hit us up Rock Genius!—but you can count us as definite fans. You can see (and annotate) Galadrielle’s other posts at Rock Genius: http://rock.rapgenius.com/artists/Galadrielle-allman

Galadrielle Allman’s memoir about her father, Duane Allman, and the family that surrounded the band is on the shelves now. If you’ve ever wondered about the legendary musician and his life beyond the stage, we are pretty sure you’ll love it.